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Contact Us

NBIP Ireland
Research Office
121 St Stephens Green
Dublin 2
Ireland

nbipadmin@rcsi.ie
+353 1 402 8651


Equipment access: please email contact person or research engineer/technician as outlined below.

Atomic Force Microscope (Asylum MFP-3D-BIO)

Purpose of this Equipment:
AFM, also referred to as SPM or Scanning Probe Microscopy, is a high-resolution imaging technique that can resolve features as small as an atomic lattice in the real space. It allows researchers to observe and manipulate at the molecular and atomic level. 
Information: The MFP-3D BIO high-performance AFM is designed specifically for biological applications. It combines molecular resolution imaging and pN force-based measurements on an inverted optical microscope. Combined with its ultra-low noise performance and unprecedented precision and accuracy, the MFP-3D-BIO has raised the bar for AFM instrumentation in bioscience
Main Features: Scanning Tip design, Atomic Resolution, Liquid immersion capability, Nanoindentation capability on soft materials, Nanolithography capability, Conductive AFM, Active Vibration isolation, Environmental chamber. 
Further technical detail is available here
Contact: Hugh J. Byrne email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Perkin Elmer Spectrum GX FT-IR Microscope

Purpose of this Equipment:
Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is a measurement technique for collecting infrared spectra. Instead of recording the amount of energy absorbed when the frequency of the infra-red light is varied (monochromator), the IR light is guided through an interferometer. After passing through the sample, the measured signal is the interferogram. Performing a mathematical Fourier transform on this signal results in a spectrum identical to that from conventional (dispersive) infrared spectroscopy. The measurement of a single spectrum is faster for the FTIR technique because the information at all frequencies is collected simultaneously. This allows multiple samples to be collected and averaged together resulting in an improvement in sensitivity.
Information: Single-beam, Michelson interferometer based, FTIR spectrometer with a dual level optical module that is sealed and desiccated. System is configured with a mid-infra-red single source. MIR and FIR beamsplitters and DTGS detector kits allow the range 7000 to 50cm-1 to be covered with a maximum resolution of 0.3cm-1. Modular system which can accommodate up to four equivalent output beams. Configured with the AutoIMAGE microscope system which can operate in transmission or reflectance modes. All manual microscope operations including adjustments to aperture, focas and illumination are fully automated and controlled from the PC. It includes built-in 35W tungsten halogen illuminator, a motorised stage and a CCD video camera. The medium beam MCT detector covers the range from 5500 to 550 cm-1. An ATR attachment with a micro germanium crystal with a range from 5500 to 600 cm-1 can be used for micro samples and ATR mapping for surface studies.
Further technical detail is available here
Contact: Hugh J. Byrne email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Perkin Elmer Spotlight 400N FT-IR Microscope

Information: Dual range bench top FT-IR instrument. Fully optimized performance is achieved by the provision of dual sources, dual beamsplitters and dual detectors.
For the MIR Configuration: The optical system enables you to collect data over a total range of 7800 to 370cm-1 with a best resolution of 0.5cm-1 It is fitted with an MCT (Mercury Cadmium Telluride) detector.
For the NIR Configuration: The optical system enables you to collect data over a total range of 15000 to 1250cm-1 with a best resolution of 0.5cm-1. An NIR DTGS (Deuterated Triglycine Sulphate) detector is fitted.
The instrument can operate in ratio, single beam and interferogram mode.
The PerkinElmer Spotlight 400 is an infrared imaging system allowing large sample areas to be analyzed in minutes and seconds rather than hours. Its high sensitivity allows the smallest samples to be detected, while its IR imaging speed improves problem-solving time as well as redefines maximum measurement areas, revealing information not previously available thus extending IR analysis to many new applications with 6.25 µm and 25 µm pixel resolution. There are also a number of accessories available for the system including a Universal ATR which fits directly into the sample compartment for easy analysis of liquid samples and surface coatings. We also have an ATR Imaging accessory (Germanium crystal with a refractive index of 4.0) which enables collection of ATR images from a sample area that has been visually identified using the microscope.
Further technical detail is available here
Contact: Hugh J. Byrne email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Instruments SA Raman Imaging Microscope (LabRam System)
 

Purpose of this Equipment: Raman spectroscopy is a spectroscopic technique used to study vibrational, rotational, and other low-frequency modes in a system. It relies on inelastic scattering, or Raman scattering, of monochromatic light, usually from a laser in the visible, near infrared, or near ultraviolet range. The laser light interacts with phonons or other excitations in the system, resulting in the energy of the laser photons being shifted up or down. The shift in energy gives information about the phonon modes in the system. Infrared spectroscopy yields similar, but complementary, information.
Information: Both Helium-Neon (632.8nm, 11mW) and Argon ion (514.5nm, 50mW) are available as sources. Both are polarised, enabling measurement of depolarisation ratios and studies of orientation in materials. Light is imaged to a diffraction limited spot (typically 1 micron) via the objective of an Olympus BX40 microscope. The scattered light is collected by the objective in a confocal geometry, and is dispersed onto an air cooled CCD array by one of two interchangeable gratings, 1800 lines/mm or 600lines/nm, allowing the range from 150cm-1 to 4000cm-1 to be covered in a single image, or with greater resolution in a combination of images. With the former, a spectral dispersion of 1cm-1 per pixel is achievable. The confocal, microscopic system allows measurement of powdered samples with no further sample preparation, direct measurement of liquids and solutions, as well as thin films. Spectral X-Y mapping may be performed with a precision of 0.1 micrometers. The system is furthermore equipped with a remote head which is fibre coupled to the spectrometer.
Further technical detail is available here
Contact: Hugh J. Byrne email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Horiba Jobin Yvon LabRAM HR 800 with upright microscope 
 

Information: System provides ultra high spectroscopic resolution and a unique wavelength range capability that provides both great flexibility and high performance. It is a an integrated, simple to use, and high stability bench-top instrument designed to undertake reproducible Raman measurements at high, medium or even low spectral resolution. The high resolution mode is uniquely ideal for subtle band analysis such as that for phase (crystalline/amorphous), of proteins, hydrogen and weak bonding forces and semiconductor stress measurements in fact most applications where it is important for the precise characterization of position or shape of the Raman spectral features. Band analysis in the order of 0.3 cm-1 to 1 cm-1 is particularly suited to the HR mode. Its dual capabilities also enable more routine Raman analysis and even broader band laser induced micro-fluorescence or luminescence to be conducted all upon the same bench-top instrument.
Features: Unique high, medium and low resolution multichannel spectral modes; Suitable for Raman, fluorescence and luminescence measurements; True confocality - maximum spatial resolution and better defined images; Multiple laser capability, from visible to near IR (extended NIR and UV versions); Ultimate stability; Large 1024 pixel CCD chip dimensions - various chip formats are available; Unique adjustable angle notch filter technology; Automated software operation including external cooling stages; Fast Map imaging modes.
Further technical detail is available here
Contact: Hugh J. Byrne email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Horiba Jobin Yvon LabRAM HR 800 with dual upright and inverted microscopes

Information: See information and features outlined above.
Wavelengths available: 830 nm, 785 nm, 532 nm, 473 nm.
Further technical detail is available here
Contact: Hugh J. Byrne email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Zeiss Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope

Information:Confocal microscopy offers several advantages over conventional widefield optical microscopy, including the ability to control depth of field, elimination or reduction of background information away from the focal plane (that leads to image degradation), and the capability to collect serial optical sections from thick specimens. The basic key to the confocal approach is the use of spatial filtering techniques to eliminate out-of-focus light or glare in specimens whose thickness exceeds the immediate plane of focus.
The LSM 510 META scanning system can be mounted on either a motorized inverted stand (Zeiss Axiovert 200M) or a manual upright stand (Zeiss Axioplan 2). The system offers 6 excitation wavelengths (458nm, 477nm, 488nm, 514nm, 543nm and 633nm) and for detection, three separate reflected light PMTs, each with its own adjustable pinhole and emission filter wheel. Main Features:
Z sectioning and 3D reconstruction
Time series for following cellular events (e.g., physiology experiments)
Co-localization of multiple proteins and/or dyes Emission fingerprinting (lambda stacks scan)
FRAP (Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching) experiments
Topography: visualization of 3D surfaces (e.g., materials analysis), plus measurement functions (roughness, waviness, surface areas, volumes).
Further technical detail is available here
Contact: Hugh J. Byrne email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Scanning Electron Microscope with cryostage (Hitachi SU 6600 FESEM)

Information: The scanning electron microscope images the sample surface by scanning it with a high-energy beam of electrons in a raster scan pattern. The electrons interact with the shells in atoms that make up the sample producing signals that contain information about the sample's surface topography, composition and other properties such as electrical conductivity. The types of signals produced by an SEM include secondary electrons (SE), back-scattered electrons (BSE), characteristic X-rays, light (cathodoluminescence), specimen current and transmitted electrons (STEM). Generally the most common or standard detection mode is SE imaging. The spot size in a Field Emission SEM is smaller than in conventional SEM and can therefore produce very high-resolution images, revealing details in the range of 1 to 5 nm in size.
The SU 6600 is a variable pressure FESEM with a Schottky field emission electron gun which enables excess of 200nA probe current. The SU 6600 at the FOCAS Institute is capable of SE, BSE and STEM imaging. The attainable SE image resolution is 1.2nm/30kV. The instrument is equipped with a Gatan Alto 2500 cryotransfer stage.
Further technical detail is available here
Contact: Hugh J. Byrne email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Details of additional equipment accessible through the Focas Institute at DIT are available 
here.